Strongs Small Batch Vodka | Vodka Fun Facts
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Vodka Fun Facts

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Vodka Fun Facts

  • Poland was the first country to make vodka their national drink. 
  • Poland was also the first country to export vodka.
  • Vodka is the world’s top selling spirit.
  • Vodkas may be classified into two main groups: clear vodkas and flavored vodkas.
  • The word “vodka” comes from the Russian word “Zhiznennia voda,” which means “water of life.” The literal translation is “little water.”
  • No maturation period is required for vodka.
  • Just about anything fermentable can be used to make vodka – potatoes, sugar cane, barley, molasses, and even beets.
  • Vodka’s water, its base ingredient, and filtration method are all important to its character. Potato vodkas, for example have a subtle hint of sweetness not present in other varieties.
  • In Eastern Europe, vodka is commonly drunk “neat” and ice-cold in iced glasses. This is the best way to enjoy premium vodka.
  • Both Russia and Poland claim to be the originators of vodka.
  • The first documented distillery was recorded in the Russian town of Khylnovsk in 1174. The first identifiable Polish vodkas appeared in the 11th century and were used as medicines.
  • The classic Ukrainian or Russian vodka is 40 percent (80 degrees proof), the number being attributed to the famous Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev. According to the Vodka Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia, Mendeleev thought the perfect percentage to be 38, but since spirits in his time were taxed on their strength the percentage was rounded up to 40 to simplify the tax computation. Nowadays you can also find 38 percent vodka, but is usually called “Light”.
  • Early vodka was distilled only once. However, vodka makers soon caught on to the benefits of multiple distillations, which produce higher alcohol content and greater quality.
  • The first recorded exports of Russian vodka were to Sweden in 1505.
  • Since early production methods were crude, vodka often contained impurities. Fruit, herbs or spices were used to mask these imperfections.
  • In Russia, the air bladders of fish were once used to remove impurities and improve taste after distillation. A professor in St. Petersburg discovered the method of purifying alcohol using charcoal filtration in the 18th century. This process is still widely used today.
  • In 1716, owning distilleries became the exclusive right of nobility in Russia. In 1894, a law was enacted to make the production and distribution of vodka a state monopoly in an attempt to control vodka quality.
  • Making vodka in Poland was much easier than it was in Russia. In 1546, the King of Poland issued a decree extending the right to make vodka to every citizen.
  • Vodka’s popularity spread to the U.S. by way of France after World War II. Pablo Picasso once identified the best things about post-war France as “Bridgette Bardot, modern jazz and Polish vodka.”
  • Vodka sales did not immediately take off in the U.S. Then, in the 1950s, a business-savvy food and spirits distributor introduced the Moscow Mule (made with vodka, lime juice, and ginger beer) and kicked off a vodka craze.
  • In the 1960s, vodka got a second boost from a man named Bond. Agent 007’s “vodka martini, shaken not stirred” catapulted this now-classic cocktail into instant stardom.
  • Today, vodka accounts for more than one out of every four bottles of distilled spirits consumed in the U.S.
  • Americans have acquired a taste for the unique characteristics and subtle nuances of high-quality, handcrafted vodka. Super-premium is now the fastest growing vodka segment. Sales figures grew nearly 50 percent between 2000 and 2003, and super-premium now constitutes nearly 40 percent of total vodka sales.
  • Some people believe that drinking 3 ounces of vodka a day cleanses the impurities and toxins in your body.
  • Just about anything fermentable can be used to make vodka—potatoes, sugar cane, barley, molasses, even beets. Rye and wheat are the classic grains; most of the best Russian and Swedish vodkas use wheat while Polish vodkas have a preference for rye. Molasses is used for inexpensive, mass-produced brands. American distillers use the full range of base ingredients, depending on price range and preference.
  • Potato Vodka Is Gluten Free. Since it isn’t distilled from grain like wheat and rye vodka, potato vodka can be enjoyed by people who have gluten allergies.
  • Although vodka is commonly thought of as being made from potatoes, in Russia most vodka is made from wheat or rye and vodka made from potatoes is considered inferior.
  • To remove red wine stains spray vodka on stains, scrub with a brush, and then blot dry.
  • Flavored vodkas were produced from the beginning and became a showcase for the distiller’s vodka-making skills.
  • In the 15th century a type of vodka was used for making gunpowder in Sweden.
  • The main reason why vodka became so popular in Russia was because the spirit never froze in the hard Russian winters. This is due to the high alcoholic content.
  • It was only at the end of the 19th century, with all Russian distilleries adopting a common production technique and quality standard, that the name ‘vodka’ was officially and formally recognized.
  • Add a jigger of vodka to a 12-ounce bottle of shampoo. The alcohol cleanses the scalp, removes toxins from hair, and stimulates the growth of healthy hair.
  • In 1894, the Russian chemist D.M. Mendeleev, after conducting a year and a half of research (that’s over 547 hangovers), discovered the ideal recipe for Russian vodka.  His formula was immediately recognized as superior by distilleries across Europe and is still used today. 
  • Russian soldiers involved in the Napoleonic Wars helped spread the awareness of vodka to many parts of Europe throughout the 19th century.  The increase in popularity led to escalating demand and, as a result, lower grade products were produced – based largely on distilled potato mash.
  • The alcohol in the vodka kills mold and mildew.
  • You can prolong the life of razors by filling a cup with vodka and letting your safety razor blade soak in the alcohol after shaving. The vodka disinfects the blade and prevents rusting.
  • To relieve a fever, use a washcloth to rub vodka on your chest and back as a liniment.
  • Pour vodka over an area affected with poison ivy to remove the urushiol oil from your skin.
  • Swish a shot of vodka over an aching tooth. Allow your gums to absorb some of the alcohol to numb the pain.
  • One shot of vodka (1.5 ounces) contains about 90 calories.
  • Vodka can be used to kill bees.
  • The most expensive vodka cost $1,060,00.00.  It comes from the lands of Scotland. The Diva Vodka is the world’s most expensive vodka which almost looks like a perfume bottle. Every bottle of the Diva vodka contains precious and semi-precious stones, including diamonds. The vodka is triple distilled and then passed through a sand of crushed diamonds and other gems.
  • Vodka can be stored in ice or a freezer without any crystallization of water.
  • Vodka will disinfect and alleviate a jellyfish sting.